Survivor – Ghost Island, March 15

It will be interesting to see how the tribe reacts to Chris’s return from Ghost Island – and whether Chris will bluff an idol find.
And will Donathon actually speak this episode (even if we don’t understand everything he says)?



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28 Comments

  1. Well that’s one curse broken. And the first girl to go to Ghost Island.
    That challenge was so close. Talk about nail biting.

    • I thought he played super well. Made great points and gave it a red hot go at tribal. Definitely one to watch…. in every sense of the word!

      • Very savvy 18 year old. And a good liar/bluffer. As a kid, he must have gotten out of a lot of trouble with his creative stories.

        • I haven’t got everyone clear in my head yet, but now remember who he is. wow. super impressive and a bucket load more likeable than Bradley, who I do not warm to AT ALL.

          • Bradley gives me the horrors. Entitled, stupid, and a bully until he hears there is an idol in play and looks like he is about to cry. If Michael lasts until the merge he could just win.

  2. I can understand Donathan. But his name needs to start with a J. Or just be Don. Saying “Donathan” sounds like you have a speech impediment.

    • I loathe parents that try to be “clever” with names. Don’t they have the imagination to understand the lifelong discomfort they are impose on someone they supposedly love.
      I worked with a girl called Candy with a sister called Honey. I kid you not.
      And Destiny, which was only weird when she answered the phone (no, she didn’t find it funny).
      Michael Jackson named all of his children Michael (including Paris-Michael), which says a lot about Michael Jackson as a person.
      But its people who can’t spell who should be sent to a special purgatory, as I can personally attest. Although I always thought Eppon’knee-Rae was the funniest joke in Kath and Kim.
      Gosh, I think you just touched on a sore point for me.

      • I came across a little girl today…Mignon. Oh dear.

        Then there is, “No Mrs ….it’s Ta liah., not Taliah”. Same spelling, but you have to memorize the the emphasis.

      • I went out with a guy whose entire family called his sister “Sis”, including Mum and Dad. It was like she had no identity outside of her relationship to her brothers.
        And I was supposed to call her Sis as well. Obviously, I could not. She was not my sister. Interesting times, going all that time never saying someone’s name.

        • To them, Sis had probably become her name, like Pop had become my grandad’s name, and everyone in and out of family called my grandma Dearie. Not sure where that originated. My grandad called her Gem. Her name was Grace. Grace Ethel Marguerite Toussaint. See where he got Gem. Only he called her Gem. To everyone else she was Dearie. Almost none of their kids were called by their birth names, ever. Coral, Crystal, Frank, Diamond, Pearl, Lincoln became Bubbles, Jilly, Sonny Boy, Di, Pearl Billy. I had an Aunty Bubbles and an Uncle Sonny Boy.
          I think it’s a Sri Lankan thing, and Indian.

        • I’m all for pet names within a family …. but I wasn’t family. That’s like all my daughter’s friends calling me Mum. Not going to happen – on either side of the conversation.

          • These weren’t just pet names, Bobi. Everyone called/calls them Bubbles etc. I read a book about how Indians give their kids two names. One is their given/official name and the other is more important because it is what they are called. I think I read it in The Namesake by Jumpa Lahiri. My family’s culture was a mix of Sri Lankan, Indian and European. As I write this I am wobbling my head. 😉 Not really. I can’t do that.

      • My son had a friend called Alicia in kindy. I wrote the birthday card as I thought it should be written but was kindly put in my place by her mother and told that I had spelled it wrong. Who would have picked Alishaa? Right then I knew we wouldn’t be friends.
        Still, she was a nicer woman than McKaylah’s mother. She had a dummy spit that she constantly had to spell it as even Teachers couldn’t get it ‘right’. Well, der.
        End of rant. (This may be one of my sensitive subjects.)

        • And don’t forget Ja mie, (pronounced Ja may).

          I also came across a little girl with two first names hyphenated, and you had to say them both. It was a mouthful. Maybe the parents couldn’t decide so she wound up with something like Maye- Eve.
          Try saying that all day.

      • Worst I have heard (and this was a real child) is “abcd”. When you say it, it doesn’t sound so bad “ab-si-dee” but seriously, why give your child an unpronouncable name?

  3. Here we go. They are already going for the strong, likeable players, leaving us the dross. I hope Michael can break the Survivor rule, and breaks through the feeding piranhas.

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    • Agree, Daisy. As soon as the line comes out about needing to get rid of the “strong” players first, I know that most of my favourite players will be targeted. I too like Michael, and I thought he was very clever, although it failed. I worry now that he will be gone next.

      In the US series they don’t seem to be too concerned about keeping tribes physically strong to win challenges. Is it because they actually want to go to tribal (they don’t fear it much)? or is it because they know that the producers will not allow a super-tribe to develop (like the first Aussie series) and things will be shaken up very quickly if one tribe seems strong?

  4. I’ve never understood the American’s obsession with peanut butter. They go mad for it. I would not have been busting a gut for peanut butter.

    • I love PB, but it is the obsession with putting jam (“jelly”) with it that I dislike.

      I don’t know if it is just an illusion, but it looks to me like Americans (and Canadians my SIL tells me) like everything to taste sweet. Bacon with maple syrup? Poptarts for breakfast? Also, my SIL said she had trouble buying bread that wasn’t sweetened.

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